The Club of Rome and Education

The Club of Rome:

Eugenics is a lot like all the other arrows in the quiver of the social engineer. Francis Fukayama’s book The End of History and The Last Man is a powerful reminder of how much ‘absolute religions’ are mere tool for the elite, and I think everyone should read what he bluntly states. In order to design or engineer a quality environment we must have ethics or principles that allow decisions to be made that benefit all life on earth rather than a few elites who operate to benefit their cronies and share a little with their paladins in some Physiocratic ‘trickle down’ approach to the governance and resources or opportunities that humanity has the duty to fulfill according to some over-riding purpose. That purpose might be divine but it must make sense and be commonly apprehended or shared. I happen to think there is an intelligence and collective conscious design. I also think we are part of this design and can make mincemeat or a thorough botchery of it. We are individually responsible for being like gods as Jesus (John 10:34) and all so many adepts have made eloquently apparent. We are part of God and should help she/he/it achieve what is RIGHT.

Is that an elitist attitude? Maybe it is at some point, because I am not one who caters to the destruction of the human gene pool or one who thinks anyone deserves a free ride at the heart of it. That is not to suggest that I think everyone should not be enabled and encouraged far more than has been done in the WASP world of history in the last two millennia and more. I probably share more with Thomas Paine and his New World Order types than I share with bleeding heart naïve do-gooders who seek something they have not fully examined. I think helping babies exist and take food from the mouths of others in India was not a godly or good thing, for example. The Club of Rome and I share a great deal in terms of how we view the opportunities and problems that our leaders must address. Here is a good point they make.

“Systems of education are less and less adapted to the new issues, to the new emerging global society we are presently involved in. New priorities force us to redefine the role of education, which should be conceived as a permanent learning process.   Transmission  of knowledge is no longer sufficient, and new objectives such as developing one’s own potential and creativity, or the capacity of adaptation to change are becoming essential in a rapidly changing world.

The Club of Rome considers that education is both part of the global problematique and also an essential tool to become an effective actor in control of one’s own life and within society. If there are “Limits to Growth”, there are “No Limits to Learning” (titles of two Reports to the Club of Rome).” (1)

Their recommendations to limit population growth can be seen from many points of view but their prognostications of doom and gloom have not considered various technologies which continue to make it possible that the outcomes their reports have predicted will occur. In fact there are technologies I think they are not even aware of if you go by what they say on their web site. There is no reason to limit population growth if we enable all people to fulfull their potential. However, that certainly is not being done and the number of people who know their soulful potential to any real extent if less than one per cent.